Current Exhibition

July 17 – August 10, 2014

On Thursday, July 17th, a group of artists will have exhibitions for the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The gallery will have six solo shows (painting and sculpture). The work will be on display through August 10th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, July 19th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Brenda Goodman

Painting

 

Brenda Goodman, Final Knot

  Click -here- for images of from the exhibition.

 

“About two years ago, I began a transition in my life that had a significant impact on these paintings. I felt the reality of having moved from New York City to the Catskill Mountains in a new way, realizing the impact it was having on my career as well as on my sense of identity as an artist. At the same time, being just a year away from turning 70, I was motivated to lose weight and improve my overall health. Consequently, my former 185 pound body became a thin 115 pounds. I felt healthier, more energized, more animated, and more confident. These changes have had a positive effect on this current body of work, which I began in late spring a year ago. My work has always reflected and expressed my internal life and, like myself, I feel the new paintings are bold, bright, animated, and confident.”

Brenda Goodman, 2014

 

 

Sculpture Garden

Maud Bryt

 

Maud Bryt

  Click -here- for images of from the exhibition.

 

 “Inspired by my reading of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and looking at natural rock formations, these figures and backs are about coming into being, including an unwieldiness that seems central to the human condition.  My figures end up being larger than life size, I think because that feels intimate to me, the way a body close at hand looks and feels– very present and touchable, but unknowable.

I like to make things in plaster because it is so versatile– wet and dry, plastic and stiff, good for modeling, carving and construction.  Casting into bronze is thrilling and adds a permanence that is like a promise.”

Maud Bryt, 2014

 

Carriage House, Ground Floor

Bruce Gagnier

Painting

 

Bruce Gagnier

  Click -here- for images of from the exhibition.

 

The attempt to form images which would appear as solid bodies in palpable space – a solid form at a felt distance; real to the mind as sensual figures in a solid depth; sculptural forms in the air, through Painting, seems wishful in my case, compromised it seems by the resistance of the materials which leave the image embedded in their own reality. The attempt to paint changes the imagined form which then characterizes the picture plane. The nature of the desire remains.  One wishes the necessary activity (painting) would disappear and pass into the revelation of the bodies of these people as I would want them to be.

Bruce M. Gagnier, 2014

 

Carriage House, Second Floor

Jane Culp

Suspect Terrain: Paintings of the
Southern California Desert and Mountains

 

Jane Culp

  Click -here- for images of from the exhibition.

 

” I am overwhelmed with the feelings of awe and amazement for the Western desert Landscape , where raw sculpted earth is pounded with intense unforgiving daylight, and where  immense spaces attach to an ever present horizon line of sight which sports caricatures of stubby balancing vegetation. An infinite black velvet bowl of starry night offers an antidote to this tortured taunt skin of landscape.  Nature is always more than it seems, it is suspect in that it requires detective work to see the particular story about how it is made, and that the unbelievable can be physically actual.  In these on site wilderness paintings, primal forces that push, stretch, and crumple vast forms are brushed in a painted language inherited from Tizian, Cezanne and Soutine.  Painting outdoors is a passionate process of all out scrambling to find moving painted gesture that captures the manner in which my eyes and brain comprehend this pictorial drama in real space and time before my brain gets fried or the light cunningly reverses appearances.

Increasingly, the “unfolding events” that make up these perceptual landscape paintings can be reached only thru 4 wheel drive.  Like a strange morphed creature who lives within the sand and rock troughs of an ancient seabed, the distance between eye and beauty has narrowed and the visible world has become, once again, instinct.”

Jane Culp, 2014

 

Carriage House, Third Floor

Susanna Heller

Painting

 

Susanna Heller

  Click -here- for images of from the exhibition.

 

THOUGHTS ON WALKING/PAINTING/DRAWING THE CITY

Walking the city. The everyday conditions of time and place take form during a walk. As an artist, I am recording and translating these conditions and moments of action into drawings and paintings. Visual descriptions of the city are full of the contradictions arising from urban agglomerations. The road to resolution starts with committing to a mark: for me its pencil to paper or brush to canvas. This is how I take a stand.

A painting, like a walk, connects the physical experience (feet on the ground/paint on the canvas) to movement, energy, and space. Past, present and future are all ignited with each moment of seeing or each step taken. Ernst Bloch says we all live in different ‘nows’, but in a painting, you enter and travel in a multitude of ways at the same moment, a time element that is not linear but cyclical! A painter reads and depicts the thicks and thins of urban routes. Visual language is not a real lived experience, but through the viewer’s gaze, a painting can participate in real lived experience. Paint can bend, stretch and multiply space and time in one place. It can bring that which is invisible or unconscious, unnoticed or unnamed, into the forefront of the familiar everyday life.

I paint tactically, not strategically. The practice itself is foremost. Through the scores of drawings I have made during my walk, which surround me when I’m painting, I always connected to the experience of movement in the world. The work is non-formulaic and without physical hierarchies or imperatives. This is why the surface, mark, texture, density, etc, can vary so wildly within each painting, and from painting to painting. The work is not a reduction of the experience of a walk; it is an exposition of the visual stories of that walk.

My work derives directly from drawings made on site as I watch and walk the city. My process always involves an extensive number of drawings that cover the walls of my studio. I make the paintings after months of synthesizing and developing and reworking the drawings into more complex, fractured and multiple spatial narratives. The surface marks, texture and quality are extremely important and are always newly invented as each work is made. This is necessary in
order to keep a non-hierarchical expectation in what I am trying to depict. Not a practical method, but one that allows me to stay connected to the place and idea. Whether moving through the city, or perched on top of a bridge, or at a high window, my interest is in the seeming contradiction between the one static finite object that is a canvas with pigment, and the infinite and highly volatile interior and exterior space being portrayed in the work

Susanna Heller, 2014 

 

Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Dave Hardy

Town and Country

 

Dave Hardy

“I grew up around art. My parents make a living at outdoor art fairs. Every winter we’d drive to Florida, weekends spent selling etchings in some town I hadn’t been to since the year before. Sometimes we brought the cats.

Peering out the window of those endless van-rides stays with me; abandoned monuments pushing up against each other; signs and materials pressing into forms, suspended outside the glass, like bodies in an abject struggle with gravity and time.

In my work, found tabletops, shower doors, and other vestiges left for dead are transformed in seemingly weightless arrangements; rigid forms imply temporal fragility. Corporeality is petrified to reveal the abstract and provisional architecture of the cast aside.”

Dave Hardy, 2014

 

 Hours:  Thursdays through Mondays, 11 – 5 pm and by appointment

Contact Information

Contact Information

John Davis Gallery 362 1/2 Warren Street Hudson, New York 12534

518.828.5907

art@johndavisgallery.com

Hours:  Thursdays through Mondays, 11 – 5 pm and by appointment