2016

 

Claude Carone

Paintings

On Saturday, November 12th, there will be a solo exhibition by Claude Carone in the Main Galleries. The Carriage House will be closed for the winter season. The work will be on display through December 4th with a reception for the artist on Saturday November 12th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Claude Carone, Red Abstraction, polymer and collage on wood, 24 x 27 inches

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“My paintings use a vast vocabulary of space to articulate a border area linking consciousness and the unconscious dream state. Through the use of color, each of which has its own specific weight, I organize space to establish relationships between the various elements in the paintings. While considering planes, I create a sense of depth and volume with multiple perspectives. Through juxtaposing depth and surface, the viewer is drawn into unfamiliar forms of perceptive consciousness.

Like music, my paintings show both major movements and the elaborations that enrich them. And just as silence serves to shape musical mass and duration, the implied regions beyond each painting serve to form the space within.”

–Claude Carone, 2016

On Saturday, October 15th, there will be an exhibition of five artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through November 6th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, October 15th, from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries & Sculpture Garden

Leonid Lerman

Touched by Verses and Related Works

“Touched by Verses (detail),” 2005, plaster, gold leaf, patina, 27.5 x 24 x 23 inches

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I first saw the book “Last Man” years ago, visiting friend in France.  When I first read it, the text resonated with me because it seemed to have everything … Upon further reading I came to the realization that had I not become a sculptor, I would have expressed myself in the same manner, used in the book. I instantly recognized that  “space” in its text: it was very tight, difficult to overcome, and once overcome – would bring simultaneous joy and pain.

I entered the text and remained there. That was my “home.” Or, rather, the universe of this text happened to be the same space where I had already been dwelling for quite some time.  Each word had form, weight, volume, and plasticity – the very same attributes that define sculpture.

I decided to see if I could bring this text into my work. Why? I don’t know exactly, but I felt emotionally compelled to do so. Maurice Blanchot was able to capture these feelings through literature, and I questioned whether I could do the same through sculpture…

Here is some of it:

‘He gave me the feeling of eternity, of a person who would need no justification.  I went back to positing a God, the better to see them as invisible to each other.  He enriched me with my own ignorance, I mean he added something to me that I don’t know.  The moment we met, I was lost to myself, but I also lost much more, and the surprising thing is that I struggle, that I can still struggle to get it back.  Where does that come from?  Where does it come from that in the space where I am, where he has brought me, I constantly go back near the point where everything could start up again as though with a new beginning?  For this, it would be enough to…. He says it would be enough if, in fact, I stopped struggling.’

From The Last Man by Maurice Blanchot
Translated from the French by Lydia Davis”

Leonid Lerman, 2016

 

Carriage House, Ground Floor

Paul Harbutt

New Work

harbutt-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“Occasionally, there occur dramatic events that, from one day to another, profoundly change us.  They can create seismic shifts in our lives, and leave us stunned, unable to grasp in a rational way what just happened.

During this past Spring, one of my dearest friends suddenly died. She was a fellow artist from Australia, and I had known her for well over forty years.

We first met in the early 70s on some stairs during a crazy SOHO loft party.  She had strikingly beautiful ice blue eyes, wild blond hair, and was just bursting with the joy of youth. She was outrageous, funny, and irresistible, and after 15 minutes of intense conversation, where I learnt where she came from, what she did, and whom she had just passionately fallen in love with, I realized that I now had a new friend.  In fact, she became one of my most adored and intimate friends, and part of my life.  So when I heard that she was dying, it was devastating.

During the weeks that had led up to her death, I was deeply involved in moving to a wonderful new studio. When I eventually settled down, and started thinking about making some new work, I realized that I wanted to make these new paintings about my dear friend. I felt an overwhelming and intense desire to hold on to her in some way and keep her forever in this world. By making paintings about her I thought that I could make her immortal, and at the same time transform my grief into something tangible and positive.

Thus began this new series of works. From my perspective, they are full of Wendy. Her wild energy, and joie de vivre, and the intense and sensual color that she seemed to radiate. And hopefully, they are also full of her endless generosity and love.”

Paul Harbutt, 2016

Carriage House, Second Floor

Leticia Ortega Cortes

Paintings

leticia-ortega-cortes

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I’m always negotiating with my painting imagery as I compose with a blend of abstraction and representation.

For me, painting begins with preparation of the surface using a rigid-support with dry gesso, which yields a smooth, absorbent, and luminous substrate. The way paint and pigments perform on the surface is a constant revelation for me.

Whether through a veiling process and variations in saturation, tone and hue, the reference to landscape and atmospheric settings are implied as in Rothko’s Blue Green and Brown painting. In some instances the reference to nature is absent and abstract and reductive forms take shape.”

Leticia Ortega Cortes, 2016

Carriage House, Third Floor

Pamela Cardwell

Paintings

cardwell-pc-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I begin paintings by drawing the shapes on natural forms, building rhythms with line and color.  Involvement in the process of making the painting builds energy and dictates how the painting will look and feel.  In other words, work comes out of work.  These are slow paintings.

I do not impose ideas upon the painting process instead I allow them to evoke or suggest landscape and the figure.  I am a swimmer and work through a body relation to materials.  Both painting and swimming teach me the meaning of timing and the beauty in precision of both physical and mental thought.

Thanks to the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, Louisiana.”

         Pamela Cardwell, 2016

Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Jock Ireland

Abstract Figures and Reliefs

seated-fig2-ireland-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I really don’t know what to say about my work. Maybe I’m trying to make “abstract figures.” Some acknowledgements might be useful.

I’m very much a New York Studio School student. I might “acknowledge” how important Natalie Charkow Hollander and her sculpture are to me.  I might say Natalie’s the one and only sensible person ever to be associated with the Studio School—partly to embarrass Natalie, partly to blame her for all the shortcomings of my work—but also to suggest the Studio School’s not the place you might imagine. It’s not the place I might imagine.

A couple of years ago I stumbled across the Abstract Critical website. It’s since become abcrit.wordpress.com and brancasterchronicles.wordpress.com. It’s become a new Studio School, a Studio School away from the Studio School for me. If the people associated with these websites are known at all in the States, it’s as a bunch of Greenbergian formalists, a bunch of bozos. They are NOT bozos to me. Their work and their talk has been inspirational.

Finally: John Davis. The John Davis Gallery is simply an art gallery. It’s not a giant, complicated, commercial art/baloney operation. I’m so lucky to have a show here. John really should be blamed for the work!”

Jock Ireland

On Saturday, September 17th, there will be an exhibition of six artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through October 9th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, September 17th, from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Fran Shalom

New Work

Fortissimo-web

Fortissimo, 2016, oil on wood, 36 x 30 Inches

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I am a modernist abstract painter with a pop sensibility. My works balance the formal with the playful, paring down shapes and ideas into their most basic forms. It is a search for clarity and humor, as is evidenced by the shapes and colors in my paintings: cartoony, bright, blobby as well as a strong dynamic presence. Ultimately, it is important that the viewer becomes involved with the paintings, tempting them to stay long enough with the images to connect to a narrative that is at once ambiguous yet taps into the specifics and subtleties of their own lives..”

            Fran Shalom, 2016

  

Sculpture Garden & Carriage House, Ground Floor

Bruce Gagnier

Sculpture

web-Yensine-2015-painted Hydrocal 64 x 12 x 17-cmyk-front-PC

 

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“The problem of representing the human in the form of the figure is that they do not necessarily resemble one another.”

Bruce Gagnier, 2016

 Courtesy Lori Bookstein Fine Arts

  

Carriage House, Ground Floor

Lois Dickson

Paintings

Nemo-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

 
“I continue to be interested primarily in the fundamentals of picture making: form, space, color.  With this recent body of work, I am also opening the door to surprise narratives.  While I always hope to invite something “dark”, I find humorous personalities taking up residence. I think I’ll let them stay for now.”

Lois Dickson, 2016

  

 Carriage House, Second Floor

William Stone

Home is Where the Hearth Is

William_Stone_Hearth web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“Very pleased to be doing my show on the floor in the back building with the multiple small rooms.  As many of my pieces are furniture related;  chairs, lamps, beds, tables and paintings (I consider paintings furniture), I will treat it as an apartment.  I will be the interior decorator.  Most of the work is on the art side of the line between art and design. Much of it is unusable.  I call some of the pieces furniture follies.”

William Stone, 2016

  

Carriage House, Third Floor

Gabriel Phipps

Paintings

Pile Driver-web

 

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“The summer after receiving my terminal degree, I had a formative art-viewing experience while visiting the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. I waded into a large, crowded gallery and saw for the first time The Night Watch. Standing before Rembrandt’s life-size figures, I witnessed pictorial alchemy – Rembrandt’s painted people presented themselves more vividly, more realistically than the flesh and blood people standing between myself and the canvas. It was then that I understood great painting is never merely a representation of something – it contains a glimmer of life itself.

It wasn’t merely Rembrandt’s formal mastery of anatomy, perspective and light. The Night Watch had what de Kooning described as the ‘otherness’ of great painting; an unquantifiable quality that one may never fully comprehend, while aspiring to capture it.

I asked myself ‘how might I do something analogous – make a living picture using the language of abstraction?’ To do so using Rembrandt’s paint vernacular seemed nigh impossible and redundant. I looked to twentieth century painters with related goals, among them John Walker, Philip Guston and Pablo Picasso. While being greatly inspired by their work, I decided to seek solutions of my own,

I began with the idea of infusing human presence in geometric structures. I used color vibration and pattern as a pulse or heartbeat. Light and form were to reside on the picture plane and push out into the viewer’s space, confronting him as an actual person would. Yet more was needed to represent the complexities and contradictions of life – I wanted the paintings to encapsulate a breadth of visual notions and phenomena as well as my divergent interests and influences.

The geometric units that now reverberate through the work are at once lighthearted and serious, flat and volumetric, solid and ephemeral, synthetic and organic, static and kinetic, fictitious and real; they are structures seen from above and from the ground; they are free-standing and verge on collapse; they speak of topographies, metal shards, pink flesh and computer screens; they pay barbed homage to modernism while embodying someone who is no one, someplace that is no place.

The duality of the paintings, their refusal to fit into a single reading, their very instability makes them more than the sum of their parts – it gives them vitality and perhaps a flicker of life.”

Gabriel Phipps

                           

Carriage House, Fourth Floor

“Miriam Bloom

Wherever You Roam

front

 

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“Poets and philosophers from Baudelaire to Heinrich Heine to Walter Benjamin have discussed the contrast between the eternal canon of beauty embodied in classical sculpture and its geometric measures in contrast to fashion, which, being ephemeral, is the quintessential of-the-moment art form. The juxtaposition of ancient sculpture and modern costume provides a key to the art of our time, which emphasizes the clash between high and low as well as travesty and friction.

In 2010, I began to create “conceptual fashion” to activate and comment on the underlying three-dimensional forms.  The contrast of ideal, formal sculptural concerns with the temporary, sociological language of clothing and how these two languages make a statement together has become an obsessive investigation.  In this fusion, the meanings of sculpture as well as that of clothing are redefined and reconceptualized.”

Miriam Bloom

 

                              

On Saturday, August 20, there will be an exhibition of five artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through September 11 with a reception for the artists on Saturday, August 20, from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Rodney Dickson

Painting

Untitled, 2016, oil on board, 8 x 5 feet

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I am trying to unearth something that is new, genuine and bring it into the world, to reveal something essential in life that transcends beyond a painting. Van Gogh did this for example, so it is not an impossible task but I have not found it to be particularly easy. So I keep on trying, day after day and although I realize I am most unlikely to achieve my goal, I would rather try and fail to achieve such a thing than settle for less.”

            Rodney Dickson, 2016

Sculpture Garden & Carriage House, Ground Floor

Willard Boepple

Sculpture

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I’m an abstract sculptor and I want my work to speak directly without narrative or message other than that which is created by the sculpture’s own form and presence. I hope for my sculpture to work via the abstract relations between its parts, like music. Abstract sculpture’s privilege is to be driven purely by the visual experience of it and by that to reach through the eye into the mind and, when it is good, straight into the heart.”

Willard Boepple, 2016

The sculptor Willard Boepple has exhibited widely since the early seventies. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of New York, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Storm King Art Center, The National Academy, The Fitz-William and numerous other public and private collections worldwide.  He is represented by Lori Bookstein Fine Art in New York and Maddox Arts in London.

He has served on the faculties of Bennington College and The Boston Museum School and has traveled extensively in Africa as a U.S. State Dept. Visiting Cultural Specialist. For twenty years he was chairman of the Triangle Artists’ Workshop in New York and serves on the boards of the Vermont Studio Center and the National Academy.  He lives and works in New York and Vermont and frequently in the UK where he makes prints with Kip Gresham at the Print Studio, Cambridge.

Courtesy Lori Bookstein Fine Arts

 

Carriage House, Second Floor

JJ Manford

Wanderers and Wildflowers
New Paintings

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“This new body of work elaborates upon my preexistent lexicon of forms, towards a more overtly representational painterly language, which includes:  Spindly, Calder-like depictions of aging & solitary wanderers, magic cats, meditatively poised plant goddesses, esoteric language plants, and a Quixote-esque horseman traversing primordial-hieroglyph forests.”

JJ Manford, 2016

 

Carriage House, Third Floor

Nina Maric

Paintings

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

Daydreaming about the world

To the north of the far north, there lies the sea of shadows: Heavenly Lake.
In it lives a fish whose length and breadth are several lis long.
His name is Kun.
There also lives a bird whose name is Peng.
His wings are like clouds suspended in the sky and his body is in proportion to the clouds.
Does the world know that such creatures exist?

 

Matheiu Remi
Anthology of the Myths and
Legends of Ancient China

 

Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Jon Isherwood

Wood Blocks and Prints

 

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

Isherwood is showing newly developed wood reliefs that are a further development of his ongoing dialogue with the associative sensations of pattern and surface. Carved lines contour the surfaces to emphasize the convergence between pattern, surface, color and image and create the illusion of expansiveness and provoke associations to patterning, layering and veiled imagery.

The tension between shape, pattern, color and surface that characterizes his new work is further reflected in the tensions surrounding his technique and material. These wood carvings are the result of a unique process in which hand drawing, silk screen printing processes interface with digital technologies. Allowing Isherwood to attain an uncompromised precision in his treatment of the incised surfaces, which play with and against the swelling, fleshy, soft and yet substantial character of the wood.

 

On Saturday, July 23, there will be an exhibition of four artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through August 14 with a reception for the artists on Saturday, July 23 from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Yi Zhang

Sculpture

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

Fabrication through collage construction is at the working center of my practice of Sculpture. The work process is based on a series of intuitive choices and actions; a making and constructing something that results in vibration of poetic mystery. My original sensation; the one I get from certain materials, leads to a series of physical actions transforming them into something new. Different substances, connected together, communicate and share their innate life producing new emotions and revealing their potential inner natures. The actions performed, the process, emanate from my emotion and reaction to the possible combination of forms. The particular emotion revealed in the end is a record of the sensations recalled from the materials and is directed by and connects with my psychological world, ultimately producing a sculpture. My body movement as a measurement of feeling is involved in the process of the making and relates dimension and proportion of the artwork back to the my body. The spontaneous process making every sculpture is a unique and unpremeditated product of my soul, which is un-reproducible.

           Yi Zhang, 2016

 


Sculpture Garden & Carriage House, Ground Floor

Willard Boepple

Sculpture

 

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I’m an abstract sculptor and I want my work to speak directly without narrative or message other than that which is created by the sculpture’s own form and presence. I hope for my sculpture to work via the abstract relations between its parts, like music. Abstract sculpture’s privilege is to be driven purely by the visual experience of it and by that to reach through the eye into the mind and, when it is good, straight into the heart.”

Willard Boepple, 2016

The sculptor Willard Boepple has exhibited widely since the early seventies. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of New York, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Storm King Art Center, The National Academy, The Fitz-William and numerous other public and private collections world wide.  He is represented by Lori Bookstein Fine Art in New York and Maddox Arts in London.

He has served on the faculties of Bennington College and The Boston Museum School and has traveled extensively in Africa as a U.S. State Dept Visiting Cultural Specialist. For twenty years he was chairman of the Triangle Artists’ Workshop in New York and serves on the boards of the Vermont Studio Center and the National Academy.  He lives and works in New York and Vermont and frequently in the UK where he makes prints with Kip Gresham at the Print Studio, Cambridge.

Courtesy Lori Bookstein Fine Art

 

Carriage House. Second and Fourth Floors

John Dugdale

Photography

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

What language shall I borrow…

During Easter this year I heard this beloved hymn written in 1830 and thought to myself what language had I borrowed to express myself after my sudden loss of sight in 1992. As I stepped out of St. Vincent’s Hospital, the overwhelming thought and feeling that I had was to record my presence on the planet and in my community using my wood, glass and brass large format camera. Losing my eyesight but not my vision lead to an inevitable turning away from commercial work and a pent-up bursting out of imagery I meant to do earlier in my career. Using the language of the late 19th c. romantic photographers, and with the help of family and friends within a matter of weeks, I had a show of cyanotypes. Since I was a child with the toy camera my mother gave me it was my instinct at eleven to create allegorical and metaphorical photographs of my sister posing as the Venus de Milo, among other things. It suited me well to be a photographer who even before the change in my sight created tableaus from the history of art, literature and music. Returning to my studio and through listening to the great american transcendentalists, it was very simple to translate their work into imagery, even if it was just a teacup for Emily Dickinson or a strongly muscled man for Walt Whitman, or a nod to Emerson’s insight into what he called “the oversoul.”

I chose to use the simple process called cyanotype, which creates an ethereal cobalt blue. Invented in 1842, it only needed iron salts, water, and the light of the sun. It seemed like the right choice. What I did not know was the impact that the color would have with most of the viewers who attended the show. It seemed to unleash  something in them. The response of the work was a tremendous surprise. I thought I was making these pictures for myself, my friends, and my family but they turned out to be for everyone. I then began the exhilarating process of recording everything around me, including myself, my family, my lover, and our friends, wildly documenting everything I was near, a process that is on going. The lens of the camera became my eyesight.

In retrospect, wondering about the enormous personal reaction to these photographs, even if it was just a still life from my house, it took me some time to realize the universality of the human experience. I did not know it then but translating some very powerful experiences into pictures that were about beauty, a habit from my earlier career, the stillness of these images made it easier to engage with my audience.  Again, I realized that in the perfect quietness of the images people could bring their own experience. I guess that is the secret of all artwork, but to me it was a wonderful surprise and deeply fulfilling.

Since that time I had been asked many times about my “body of work.” With the first pictures I took, I began what would be one body of work added to over a lifetime. My visual experience changes everyday, and I see all that I need in my heart and in my mind to create what has turned into a pictorial autobiography. I hope you enjoy the images that were chosen for this show, it includes recent and classic cyanotypes and gold toned silver gelatin prints. They span 25 years, starting in 1992 and continuing through until this spring.

From the first day I thought of showing my work, each picture was meant to be a missile sent into the world. I use handblown glass that gives a life to the pictures when you pass by. The glass represents strength and fragility, which seems appropriate to me. The frames were milled specially, copying a 19th c. academic style that I had already owned. I try not to send them out unframed, they don’t seem complete to me otherwise. The language of photography that I borrowed has helped me to feel like a complete person in no small manner. The response to my photographs was and continues to be an enormous part of my healing process.

Looking forward to meeting you.

Yours,

John Dugdale, 2016

 

Carriage House, Third Floor

Mark Tambella

New Paintings 2015-2016

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“This new group of paintings are constructions of the modeled, the imagined, the stolen, and the remembered, built into scenes. The painted panels revisit an earlier figurative path and merge with techniques acquired from later expressionistic landscape, still life and portrait work. These pizza parlors, kitchens, casinos, bars, etc are not just textured environments of odd unnatural light , focused and not so focused human energy but dreamscapes, rich in metaphor, to be decoded through painting. Painting as a meditation on lines, colors, brushstrokes, and blank areas hanging together rhythmically on a simple flat surface transports us beyond the picture of it.”

Mark Tambella, 2016

On Thursday, June 25th, there will be an exhibition of five artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through July 17th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, June 25th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Susanna Heller

New Work

heller-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

Susanna Heller lives and paints in Brooklyn. She walks every day up and down the streets of Brooklyn and Manhattan, wildly sketching the urban landscape.

Heller’s paintings focus on space and movement, offering a constant sense of motion on the canvas. Through her application of color and paint, Heller has spent decades perfecting wind, light, and smoke. Her work brings clarity to the energy, smells and sounds of the city; perspectives are distorted, and cranes sweep across the sky as though holding up the clouds.
Often from a bird’s eye view, we are provided with the moods of an urban atmosphere at the mercy of the natural elements, influenced and changed by dawn or rain, and an accompanying sense of flight or heady vertigo. Heller’s paintings encapsulate entire cityscapes : buildings crowded together below massive weather systems shifting and changing, full of energy and in perpetual turmoil — the eye of a rumbling storm, a swinging crane, a swiftly passing cloud.

Even in her most expressive paintings of sun or storm, the city is always present; it is a distinct reminder of our home and heart and life under the enormity of Heller’s skies.

A painting, like a walk, connects the physical experience: (feet on the ground/paint on the canvas), to movement, energy, and space. Past, present and future are all ignited with each moment of seeing or each step taken. We all live in different ‘nows’, but in a painting, you enter and travel in a multitude of ways at the same moment, a time element that is not linear but cyclical!

In her paintings, Heller reads and depicts the thicks and thins of urban routes. Her visual language is not the real lived experience itself, but through the viewer’s gaze, her paintings suggest participation and reflection on that real lived experience. A painting can bend, stretch and multiply space and time in one place. It can bring that which is invisible or unconscious, unnoticed or unnamed, into the forefront of a seemingly ordinary moment.
Heller paints the high-pitched intensity of cities (mostly New York), through abstract, chaotic masses of paint that explode above and below minimal skylines which she likes to make shift and disappear.  These are sourced from hundreds of drawings done on sight during long wanderings on foot throughout the city.

The paintings are about the city, but mostly they are about “the thickness of paint and the ability of the human hand to move it.

            Susanna Heller, 2016

Courtesy Olga Korper Gallery & Magnan Metz Gallery

 

Sculpture Garden & Carriage House, Ground Floor

John Crawford

Sculpture

SCU steel tower4 87x10x3 2006_crawford-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“My interest in different kinds of structure is in part motivated by a desire to find some piece of truth outside myself which might have meaning for others.

An abstract nod to the admirable role of tribal and pre-Renaissance artists: Makers of art that is a tool for transcendence in a language accessible to all members of their community.

Farm tools, Stonehenge (another farm tool at the least), the natural structure of crystals, plants and the fractal and other mathematical patterns we often find within them.  Architectural elements, knitting, African metalwork, Dogon ladders and Nupe house-posts.

These are some of the anonymous sources that have had a great effect on how I work and think. I hope that from observation and practice I have absorbed something about structure that I have been able to incorporate into a dialect that we can share.”

John Crawford, 2016

Courtesy Lori Bookstein Fine Arts

 


Carriage House. Second Floor

Matthew Blackwell

Paintings

Blackwell-front-PC-webt

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“My work arrives by different methods.Sometimes its driven by direct observation, other times by memory or what might be or as they say in the south,”Might could be”. This kind of folkism is important to me as painterly narratives offer much possibility for imagery. This narrative may be smoky or clear and I’m often guided by the voices of music, Bob Dylan and the Bands Basement Tapes, Steve Earl, Lucinda Williams and early blues and country music. Authors of fiction also provide a jumping off point, Annie Proulx, Jim Harrison, George Saunders, Cormac McCarthy, James McBride, all aide in the telling of stories of lives that might otherwise be overlooked. Im interested in life in the hinterlands..throw a dart a map of the USA, there is a story there.

I’m less interested in illustration than a painterly approach to working. My guides are David Park, Max Beckmann and countless others…the narratives give me wiggle room for the paint to drive the car of painting, this gives me room to be innovative and surprised, which I view as very important to the process.”

Matthew Blackwell, 2016

       Courtesy Edward Thorpe Gallery

 


Carriage House, Third Floor

Herbert Reichert

Paintings

Reichert-1-pig-two-JD-web

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“An old friend describes my art as “Hans Christian Tarkovsky”.  .  .  .

My objective as an artist is to connect with my viewers on a blood memory pre-conscious level — to create images that reach into the more ancient parts of our shared humanity.  No cultural specificity – only vessels of collective sentiment (like a snow man, a church, a hut or a forest).   I want my viewers to never perceive the entirety of my creations; each painting, sculpture, or photographic image should unfold slowly and wondrously — with a steadfast reluctance. As I work in my studio, I dream that each piece will someday occupy a beloved but darkly mysterious space in some (as yet unknown) person’s private world.”

Herbert Reichert, 2016

 

Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Tom Butter

Sculpture & Painting

web-Butter-Rope-Trick

Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“Stopping just shy of some unstated limit, my work offers just enough. It rests, or sometimes stirs, in a conditional state—precarious and fresh, full of possibility. As a condition for making art or determining a piece’s completion, arriving at ‘just enough’ implies a constant negotiation. I work with what is almost there—with the not-quite-there or just-barely-there. As a result, my work is loosely constrained in a state of possibility, in an ‘as if’ state of mind: as if we are moving through the painting; as if we are the line; as if we are atop the line; as if the sculptures are another body; as if the body of the sculpture thinks; as if it is about to leap.
The conditional part of making art begs an acceptance of something just off, or perhaps absurd, like the leap involved with getting a joke—that instant when you might pause, hold your breath, then release it into laughter. In striving to make such ‘conditional’ work, I find inspiration in the spontaneity of jazz music; in the lightness and tensility of airplanes, sailboats and bridges; and in the physical characteristics of certain materials, such as steel.

I change my mind many times. My work is off-kilter, in flux. It is unstable but at peace. Challenging and intimate. So it transitions, becoming always different. It’s also true that, at times, it makes me laugh.”

            Tom Butter, 2016                                                

On Saturday, May 28th, a group of artists will open the season with a medley of exhibitions for the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. In celebration, the gallery will have five solo shows (sculpture and painting). The work will be on display through June 19th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, May 28th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 

Main Galleries

Sara Jane Roszak

New Work

Roszak-Desert-Life-web


Click -here- for images from the exhibition.

“I am still working with elemental phenomena; the sun, the moon, mountains and water, tree like forms and flower forms. Finding imagery through texture and accident and letting it resonate in my imagination.

As I get older I feel close to nature like when I was a child. I am in awe of its unpredictable invention and beauty.”

            Sara Jane Roszak, 2016

 

Sculpture Garden & Carriage House, Ground Floor

Gail Goldsmith

Sculpture

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“I’ve had a lifelong preoccupation with the figure.  This diverse group of clay sculptures, all unglazed, made over a period of fourteen years, are built from the ground up.  Standing clay figures all begin on the ground, with a footprint, with feet or shoes or with a shape that delineates an area.  While physical and material, the process is also intuitive, shaped by my responses to the needs and possibilities of the material and also by memories of past work.   I am excited wondering what will emerge.  A figure wrapped tightly may evolve over months; another may grow rapidly pushed by intense associations.  The finished figures always surprise me.”

Gail Goldsmith, 2016

  

Carriage House. Second Floor

Yura Adams

Nature Dress
Paintings and Drawings by Yura Adams

 web-Plumage Column One (1)

 
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“These works are a direct visual response to the rhythmic forms and energy observed in the natural environment of the farm where I paint. As I walk down the farm road to my studio, I am compelled to look deeply into the variety of patterns and fluid motion I observe. These include movement of water and wind, changing light, and the patterns of bird and plants. When painting, I like to use nuances of color that I have seen in changing light and improvise with hand-cut stencils, sprayed and poured paint, and loose drawing. These paintings are my love song to nature.”

Yura Adams, 2016

 

 

Carriage House, Third Floor

Dale Emmart

Giants
small panel paintings

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“Narrow columns of smoke rising from rural burn barrels are a common event, and one I pay close attention to. Spindles of vapor point to a burning waste, cleansing fields for new growth, or hinting at things of greater consequence – factual and metaphoric. I pay similar attention to other, more muscular, versions of smoke and exhaust from industrial and nuclear plant emissions. I use the insubstantial, shifting, and momentary cloud masses as subjects for my paintings and drawings. The man-made emission giants or naturally occurring plumes contain a broad vocabulary of painterly choices that rely on informed notational ‘plein air’ skills. I frequently paint outdoors for direct observation to support studio-based work. The paintings on exhibit at John Davis primarily depict transition, but also brood about environments  at risk. The work is engaged with a sense of ‘lift’ with reference taken from either man made or natural giants. The diptych and triptychs suggest greater attention to movement, transformation or shape shifting rather than muck.”

Dale Emmart, 2016

  

Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Jean Feinberg

Works on Paper

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“When I started working on these works on paper, I felt a new freedom – the freedom of finding a way to work on my delicate and beautiful Japanese papers, and the freedom of seeing and transforming the “found” compositions of color that surround me in my studio. Like Kelly, I have no desire to compose or rearrange what I find. The freedom is in seeing and making. The fact that they are seen out of the corner of my eye and take me by surprise makes them all the more beautiful and fulfilling to paint. Using paint chips to make color choices in my larger painted constructions has liberated and expanded my color choices in a similar way.  As a result of that process, my studio is scattered with piles of color chips. These “accidental compositions” have eventually become the basis of these gouaches on paper.

Jean Feinberg, 2016

 Maria Walker

Compass

 

On April 30th, 2016 there will be a solo exhibition of paintings by Maria Walker.  The work will be on display through May 22nd with a reception for the artist on April 30th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

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Untitled (Red and Green), 2013,  acrylic, unprimed linen, wood, 18 x 18 x 1.5 inches

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The paintings compass
The painting’s a compass

Wood to canvas to paint
myself to the front to the back
the object to the room to the light
color to the paint to the cloth
cloth to the wood to the paint
the window to the floor to the wall
myself to the painting to a fellow
painting.

Shift, shift. North.

Maria Walker         

 

Jane Culp

Slipping and Sliding in the Anthropocene:
Recent Paintings from California Wilderness
Desert and Mountains

 

On April 2nd, 2016 there will be a solo exhibition of paintings by Jane Culp.  The work will be on display through April 24th with a reception for the artist on April 2nd from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

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Tioga Pass Mountains with melting snow and little lake below, 2015, oil/board, 24 x 28 inches

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“Holed up in this desert, I have become a hopeless anachronism within our dominant “weedy” species. Here i have the rare opportunity to investigate  the surrounding wild lands trumpet call: it’s  geological time clock viewed thru the character of place.  The challenge is to reveal thru the language of painting  dynamic tensions that form landscape wilderness order in all its perceptually diverse and palpable glory. To make it all present.  My backpack of art knowledge and skill is never enough to get the job done.

Working along the naked flank of the eastern Sierras, and among the strange forms within the desert badlands  which the geologists call “an upside down Grand Canyon”,  I see millions of years of time stacked up in colored layers of sediment, tilted and compressed by tectonic forces, sculpted and polished by wind, rain and sun.  This very physical, visual history of  the earth forming itself is reassuring.  And so is the act of painting which puts me in touch with the sense of a present kind of eternity.  Because in my short lifetime we have come to realize that our human cusp of planet history is cause of a Sixth Extinction.   Science fiction is no longer fiction; disregarding the web of life, our  legacy is to add still another layer to the sediment.

But hope takes wing.   There are my colors, my paints that can communicate the wonder of those strange earth forms with their air and light, talking to me, reaching out from the canvas while making their own space.   As Guston said ” Painting is like having your hands in a mattress” .  My painting is about  wonder, physicality, and the welcome hard work of process.”

Jane Culp          

 

 

Scrap Wrenn

Fall in to Whole

On March 5th, 2016 there will be a solo exhibition of the work of Scrap Wrenn.  The work will be on display through March 27th with a reception for the artist on March 5th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

“adi shakti,” (detail), 2015, acrylic medium and paper
(original photographs) on wood panel, 15 x 4 feet

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These recent works invite viewers to look into and beyond the picture plane in the spirit of exploration and openness to surprise. The process giving rise to her hand-constructed paper photomontages is a daily practice of looking deeply, taking photographs, and then falling into studio focus sessions to bring forth optically engaging color-tracking motions and ground-shifting composite landscapes that allude to our photo-prolific cultural state.

Scrap’s use of pseudonym is instrumental to her direct close relationship of creative process– as a philosophic inquiry into the nature of reality itself, as attempt to collapse subject and object, and as a meditative movement of the breath in the physical making.

Photography could be seen as a devotional practice in appreciation of the world ‘as it is’ … in each unfolding moment. Then… the fine art works collapse innumerable moments in space/time to also tell a story that asks the viewer to allow the great play of imagery to inspire awe.

Scrap’s lived art process connects to interdependent entanglement within the allegory that we humans are winding paths through the collective composts of thought, matter, space, society, and culture.  Pointing to web-expansive metaphorical implications, the art exists in time, welcoming you to meet it.

 

 

Joel Longenecker

Painting

On February 6th, 2016 there will be a solo exhibition of paintings by Joel Longenecker.  The work will be on display through February 28th with a reception for the artist on the 6th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Saulpaugh Hill, 2015, acrylic and oil on wood, 54 x 47 inches

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“I am interested in how the painting process–applying, drying, scraping and reapplying–parallels the processes of growth and decay, buildup and erosion in nature.  My paintings evolve like a landscape being formed over time, each with its own unique history and topography.  I want my work to exist in the space between creation and destruction and to bring together these two opposing forces that are often indistinguishable. My aim is to capture the essence of flux and in-betweeness.”

 

Joel Longenecker                                                                                             

Elliott Green

It’s Never Winter Here

"The Seedling Plots and Plans," 2015, oil on linen, 18 x 12 inches

“The Seedling Plots and Plans,” 2015, oil on linen, 20 x 28 inches

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On January 9th, 2016 there will be a solo exhibition of paintings by Elliott Green. The work will be on display through January 31st with a reception for the artist on the 9th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

“All the paintings in this show at the John Davis Gallery were made after I moved upstate from New York City in 2005. I had thought that my home was in my head, and the ideas and images it produced would be carried independently wherever I went, but the change of place absolutely transformed my work and myself.

The drawings I made during my last year in Manhattan now feel overcrowded to me: they’re filled with figures sharing a small space, so intertwined that it’s hard to know whose limbs belong to whom. This period was followed by a two-year stretch when I made no art, and when I returned to it things spread out and the characters morphed into simpler abstract forms I called “personified abstractions.” Their behaviors are less territorial, and the airspace around them opens up into an atmosphere that is refreshed by gradually blended tones.

Then in 2011-2012, I went to Italy as a Rome Prize Fellow, and landscape entered the scene with the conviction of a protagonist. The paintings expanded with perceivable depth, and a structure was put in place to host several niches of smaller abstract paintings. Each of these are integrated and contribute to enlarge the scope of the picture.

I think merging these two genres adds a new dimension of fractioned time and polyvalence. These paintings represent a decade of transformation and have proved to me how noticeable the influence of environment can be on an artist. The landscape metaphor seems the best way for me to express a range of emotions on a single canvas. Emotions are complex because they move very quickly in sequences, and it has been exciting finding a way to convey the passage of time itself through these paintings.”

Elliott Green

 

 

Click – here- 2015 exhibitions.

 

 

Gallery hours are Thursday through Monday, 11:00 till 5:00 p.m.  For further information about the gallery, the artists and upcoming exhibitions, visit

www.johndavisgallery.com
or contact John Davis directly at 518.828.5907 or via e-mail:art@johndavisgallery.com.

 

 Hours:  Thursdays through Mondays, 11 – 5 pm and by appointment