Past Exhibitions

On Saturday, September 14th, a group of six artists will open exhibitions in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House (sculpture and painting). The works will be on display through October 6th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, September 14th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 Main Galleries

Lee Marshall

New Watercolors & Drawings

Indra’s Pearls, 2018, watercolor on paper, 22 x 30 inches

“Our work in the present waters the past as well as the future. It’s the garden we live in and the one we paint.”

Lee Marshall, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Sculpture Garden

Arnie Zimmerman

Sculpture

Recliner, 1988, stoneware clay, glaze, epoxy, 42 x 58 x 22 inches

 “Three sculptures from the 1980’s reflecting my fascination with Mayan forms of sculpture and Manueline architecture encountered in Portugal. The large scale, hollow, slab/coil built clay volumes I was producing in my studio was the ground for the overlay of newly encountered visual languages in my travels…

Arnie Zimmerman, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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First Floor Carriage House

Kim Uchiyama

Ascension

PARTHENOS, 2018, oil on linen, 72 x 66 inches

“The works in this exhibition are based on the earth, sea, and sky of ancient Greece as filtered by my modernist influences. The presence of Greek temples and their situation within their surrounding landscapes impressed me deeply when I visited them. Theatrical and dramatic, the geometry of the temples directly contrasts undulating, earthbound settings. I felt both material weight and the weight of history from these sites.

As an abstract artist, I wanted these paintings to create an architecture that would embody my response to these timeless places. I looked to find painterly equivalents for the weight, light, and scale that I had experienced. I chose to work on larger canvases, 72” x 66”.  I also used a new somber, weighted palette: absorbent earth color that includes golden ochers, olive greens, burnt reds, muted mauves. Bands of color evoke light and movement – specifically a feeling of ascension to counter this weight – and color acts as light itself, simulating sensations of heat and shade. In making these paintings, I wanted to reflect the carefully calibrated structure and wholeness of the temples in dialogue with their landscape context – and the sense of measure and integrity this can still offer us today.”

Kim Uchiyama, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Second Floor Carriage House

Stephen Niccolls

Informalism

HeavyLight, 2019, oil on canvas, 40 x 34 inches

“One way to talk about my paintings is to say that they are responses to those moments when I find myself absorbed in some mundane object that has no obvious “beauty” or “meaning” as these words are usually understood. What I’m seeing are qualities that I want to explore in my work. The idea is that these qualities become manifest, clarified, or perhaps transformed in the process of giving them expressive form.

The structure in my paintings is meant to strike a balance between order and chaos. If the structure is too organized or rigid, I feel that the painting loses vitality. The same thing happens if the structure is too chaotic. I am most satisfied when my painting is almost out of balance, yet seems to contain or generate a unique energy, demanding that the work be understood on its own terms.  ”

Stephen Niccolls, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Third Floor Carriage House

Drew Kohler

Break it Up

Self-Portrait, 2015-2018, oil on linen in  artist’s frame, 26  1/2 x 22  11/16 inches

“The images I want to convey are not known to me from the beginning, but rather are found. I start out with simple shapes and carve my way through the paint in hopes of revealing a figurative element in a cohesive atmosphere. My paintings have become deeply layered over the years: I scrape, sand, and apply color on the canvas. Through the multiple layers of pigment, certain parts start to appear–maybe a leg, part of a tree, a face, etc. I work around these emerging parts, inventing metaphors and pushing for depth so they can exist in the picture. A history builds itself through the paint, and even though I cannot see every layer, it eventually forms a density I desire. Most of the time the paintings feel arbitrary, but after a while the paint somehow falls in its destined place. In the end, the textures and shapes begin to relate to one another, creating a fixed completeness of an imagined space.“

Drew Kohler, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Fourth Floor Carriage House

Celia Gerard

Sculpture

Little pinks, 2018, Glazed porcelain, 5 x 5 x 5, 5 x 3 x 3, 4 x 3 x 4 inches

“I work primarily with essential shapes (spheres, cones, cylinders, and cubes) and elemental materials (plaster, clay, wood, metal). I incorporate recycled forms to help find new forms which give life, where both culture and experience coincide as generative powers. In the process, relationships develop and sculptures begin to exist in space. Chimeric and architectural by nature, these sculptures reference displacement, refuge, and renewal.”

Celia Gerard, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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John Davis Gallery

John Davis Gallery

On Saturday, August 17th, a group of six artists will open exhibitions in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House (sculpture, photography, and painting). The works will be on display through September 8th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, August 17th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Lois Dickson

Rocks and Caves

Channeling Orange, 2019, oil on linen, 5 x 4 feet

“Memory and invention have led me to landscape. I was thinking specifically about grottoes and caves, some halfway around the world and others just down the road. Sunken limestone towers in the ancient caves at Halong Bay demand high color and assertive brushwork, while the gentle entry of Stone Church/Dover encourages a muted palette and more meditative approach. I hope these paintings are true to the memory of place, of the caverns’ natural beauty, folklore, storied dwellers, and metamorphic past.”

Lois Dickson, 2019

 

Sculpture Garden

Benjamiin Butler

Sculpture

Specimen, 2013, cedar, 29 x 37 x 19 inches

 “My sculptures reflect the sensibility that objects are not fixed and finite, but are the product or residue of ongoing processes.  They provide evidence of unseen forces, and they point to the distinction between the human and the non-human.  Throughout the natural world, unexpected complexity emerges from simple, persistent processes.  When the order of things is not readily apparent, complexity is often mistaken for chaos.  In the rush to comprehend we often miss the wonderful unseen forces at work.  My response is to play in these boundaries between the simple and the complex, and between the complex and the overwhelming.”

Ben Butler, 2019

 

First Floor Carriage House

First Floor Carriage House

Isidro Blasco

Adrift Houses. Casas a la Deriva

 

ADRIFT HOUSES, 2019, C-Print. Wood, hardware, 20 x 15 x 12 feet

“For the exhibition, Blasco has built a large installation of iconic New York City bridges. Entitled Adrift Houses, this sprawling construction presents an unsettling narrative that reaches beyond its architectonic origins. In reality, bridges are physical structures that allow us to move from one place to another, overcoming geographical barriers. Conceptually, bridges built on consensus can bring opposing sides together.  Blasco’s bridges are fragmented and incomplete. They silently lay witness to the perilous effects of climate change and disjointed politic rhetoric. Meanwhile, as water levels advance, homes, towns, cities will be engulfed, drastically altering our habitat and way of life. In light of this, the artist envisions a New York nightmare where displaced houses are flooded, lifted off foundations, and cast adrift down river. It highlights the transitory nature of safety and security, breaking down memories of ‘home’ into repositories of fractured memories.”

Isidro Blasco

 

Second Floor Carriage House

Thaddeus Radell

Paintings

Achilles Stumbles on the Field of Troy, 2018-19, mixed media, 60 x 48 inches

‘‘We are image-makers and image-ridden.’ Phillip Guston

My work principally consists of profoundly abstracted figure compositions- intuitive constructions that begin with random marks establishing larger masses of torsos, heads, and limbs in an undefined setting. The emphasis is almost punitively laid on intuition, supported by a Cezanne-ian will build a picture through a rigorous but tempered structure. The figures are born of their surrounding environment, emerging only partially and fugitively from the mat and scarred layers of pigment. The paintings may be quite large, often eight, ten or twelve feet in width, and comprised of multiple panels. Or quite small, 6 x 8”. I use a cold wax medium combined with dry pigments, oil paint and embedded fragments of burlap.

A narrative is evident but never overt. A crown, a shield, a boat, a wheel. Though the subject has recently coalesced around my reading of Dante and Shakespeare, the settings remain extremely vague- a beach, an interior, a wood. Though often derived from actual scenes in the Inferno or King Lear, the paintings are, in the end, meditations on the relationship between the protagonists of these classic works. Work on the multiple figure compositions is accompanied by small studies of heads. These heads are always invented yet oddly specific.”

Thaddeus Radell

 

Third Floor Carriage House

Mark Saltz

Paintings

 

 

Untitled 2017 Pigment, oil, alkyd resin, mulled paint/linen 57 x 65 inches

“These Paintings are referential to specific psychological states of being related to: particular times of day, seasons of the year, and specifically felt pending weather conditions.  They produce an evocative sense of color and light through ongoing iterative manipulation; scraping, power sanding, and the literal movement of pigment from one location on the canvas to another.  Each painting asserts its own  pictorial logic; fresh canvases begin at the point the last resolved work defined itself.“

Mark Saltz, 2019

 

Fourth Floor Carriage House

Eric Banks

Configurations and Consciousness

Casualty II, 2018-19, metal, wood, plastic wire rope, fabric, paint, 34 x 19 x 15 inches

 

“The word configuration comes to mind as it serves to unite the sometimes seemingly incongruous aspects of my two-dimensional and three-dimensional work. I see space and spatial tension and issues like clustering and crowding of spaces to be reflective and reflexive of a kind of anxiety and tension I’m trying to convey, a sort of juncture of feeling and thought and a connection to consciousness with a philosophical underpinning. I try to address what I feel is a fragile and tenuous human existence often marred by terrible suffering with forms and imagery that despite their primal almost raw energy are meant to provide comfort and to serve an almost protective symbolic function and perhaps even suggest a hope of a meaning to life. I think a lot of terms of fusions, of somehow trying to create bridges between the present, and both the distant and more recent past, and to an intercultural awareness; an attempt at a sort of universality of image and illusion.

I always wish that somehow or other my work be understood in a sort of immediate, intuitive way, even by people who are not initiated into a particular cultural milieu. In this desire, I suppose I tend to stay very close to a relationship with the primal, towards an originate experience of Being with an awareness of and great respect for historical precedent coexisting with a countervailing and paradoxical inclination towards an irreverence and the desire to release oneself from its grasp and influence.                

Eric Banks, 2019

On Saturday, July 20th, a group of five artists will open exhibitions in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House (sculpture and painting). The works will be on display through August 11th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, July 20th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Benjamin Pritchard

Recent Paintings

Black Hole Group, 2019, oil on canvas, 32 x 22 inches

“The formal qualities are important ways of gaining entry into the work. Scale, light, design, force, attitude, even texture and time all lead the Painting process down a road of complexity towards a simple binary situation, an either this or that place where they ultimately rest.

Whether this takes a moment or decades the painting still has to have a specific energy that goes beyond its material.

I’m inspired by everyday events that pass but increase into intense memories that recur almost without realizing it in the studio like magic.

Benjamin Pritchard, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Sculpture Garden & First Floor Carriage House

Benjamin Butler

Sculpture

 

Specimen, 2013, cedar, 29 x 37 x 19 inches

 

 ” My sculptures reflect the sensibility that objects are not fixed and finite, but are the product or residue of ongoing processes.  They provide evidence of unseen forces, and they point to the distinction between the human and the non-human.  Throughout the natural world, unexpected complexity emerges from simple, persistent processes.  When the order of things is not readily apparent, complexity is often mistaken for chaos.  In the rush to comprehend we often miss the wonderful unseen forces at work.  My response is to play in these boundaries between the simple and the complex, and between the complex and the overwhelming.”

Ben Butler, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

Click – here- for slideshow images in the exhibition.

  

Second Floor Carriage House

Melinda Stickney-Gibson

Some Portraits

 

LAYING DOWN IN FALLING SNOW, 2019, oil on linen, 20 x 16 inches

“These are a series of paintings that I have long considered making and they were all completed over the last 18 months.

My past work in abstraction was always concerned with suggesting singular “moments”;

those times of introspection, those solitary times, those times for stories.

These portraits come from that same place.

The figure being sort of an iconic, personal reassurance that all hope is not lost.”

Melinda Stickney-Gibson, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Third Floor Carriage House

Laurel Sucsy

Painting

Sister, 2019, oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches

“Torn paper and plaster shards gather in an un-swept room.  On the floor, I find a carefully tied bow.  Like a poem, a painting can begin from any moment that captures attention in a particular way.  My work gives form to this happenstance and illuminates the relationship between fragility and balance.  I track and process shifting relationships using color and composition, seeking out the interdependence of all things.“

Laurel Sucsy, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Fourth Floor Carriage House

Natasha Wright

When Black Swallows Red

Underground, 2019, oil and glitter on panel, 10 x 8 inches

“My work explores the significance of the female body as icon.

My practice probes the politics of the representation of the female form. Gender, sexuality, vulnerability and power, seduction and aggression – these dualities motivate the dynamics of my work.

The paintings reference the political and the personal. The representation of females throughout history is considered alongside contemporary references. The Venus of Willendorf, Mary Magdalena, The Three Graces and Cardi B are some of my many muses.

The women I paint balance the grotesque and beautiful.  They are not naive to the history and male subjectivity they inherit. They claim their space to discover who they are on their own terms.

The paintings create their own symbol of female power and energy. This not only involves the subject and composition but also the attitude in which they are made. To me, the approach is just as important as the subject.

The substance of paint becomes an analogy for the body. Paint is used as a metaphor to create a skin of human experience, an idiosyncratic personality both hidden and exposed.”

                Natasha Wright, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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John Davis Gallery

On Saturday, June 22nd, a group of six artists will open exhibitions in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House (sculpture and painting). The works will be on display through July 14th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, June 22nd from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Main Galleries

Janice Nowinski

Recent Paintings

 

Upside Down Nude, 2019, oil on panel, 18 x 14 inches

 

“I make a move on my painting, step back.  I assess the painting’s response, is it accepted? Are the painting and I in agreement? Back and forth, the painting and I proceed like a mountain climber throwing the spike up to the next level and hauling themselves upward gradually to reach the summit.  At any point, the whole thing could collapse or arrive.”

Janice Nowinski, 2019

 

Art is dangerous. That’s one of its attractions:

when it ceases to be dangerous,

you don’t want it.” — Duke Ellington

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

Click – here- for slideshow images in the exhibition.

           

Sculpture Garden

Weixian Jiang

Accidental Sculpture

 

Growing #1, 12 x 12 x 63 inches,  2018, bronze

Growing #2, 12 x 12 x 56 inches,  2018, bronze

Growing #3, 12 x 12 x 50 inches,  2018, bronze

 

“Some of my materials are natural, such as bamboo, sticks, branches, feathers, and leaves. Other materials I use have very natural origins, but they are more associated with manufacturing and industry. These materials include cement, iron, plaster, ceramic, gold leaf, bronze, copper, wire, rubber bands, and glazes.  Some materials work well together, whether their origins are more natural or not. Some materials do not work well together.

My work is an exploration into what kinds of materials work well together visually, on the one hand, but more important to me is that the materials complement each other physically. I let my pieces form and inform themselves as I work. I choose my materials for how they feel, physically, in my hands, and I let one stage of the object-making tell me what form or material will come next. The idea for an ultimate, final object only begins to form in my mind as it starts to form in my hands. This is the most primary form of manufacturing, as I see it, and that is how I think of my pieces. I take a bit from nature. I take a bit from industry. These materials come together in my hands, as a process of pure manufacturing”

Weixian Jiang, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

Click – here- for slideshow images in the exhibition.

 

Ground Floor Carriage House

Vilaykorn Sayaphet

Morning Prayers

Morning Prayers (Mother and Daughter), 2018, oil on wood, 14 x 12 inches

 

“Seventeen Thousand Five Hundred and Twenty Hours Exist in Two Years

Within that time, a lot can occur. You get married. You keep making art. You work to pay your bills. You gain friendships. You lose friendships. Tragic things happen. Life gives you the full range of emotions. In my opinion, life and art are the same.

To start off, I got married and moved in with my wife. We both paint at home at opposite ends of the house. Painting while you have a full-time job is a unique challenge. To quote Picasso: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once you grow up.” A full-time job interrupts the dialogue between artist and painting. Every time you go back to the studio, you have to reconnect, but this time with a tired mind and tired body.

The art that I make is the art that I live. It is consistent with what I do on a daily basis. My art is a working man’s art. I do not know where my art will take me if I can paint for a year or two without interruption. But I accept the life that I am given. One is not better than the other.

At forty-three years old, I am still curious about the world, and where my painting will take me.”

Vilaykorn Sayaphet, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Carriage House. Second Floor

Nicholas Cairns

Painting

 Ganglia, 2018, acrylic mosaic on panel, 48 x 36 Inches

 

“My recent paintings mark an attempt to forge non-formulaic imagery that is simultaneously recognizable and ambiguous, suggestive of both microcosm and macrocosm. Through the use of automatic and ‘accidental’ processes, the work originates in the subconscious but is ultimately brought to conscious realization through drawing. It is this drawing, rooted in a deep exploration of form and the human figure, that gives definition and clarity and ultimately a purpose to the imagery it creates.”

Nicholas Cairns, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Carriage House, Third Floor

Joanne Lobotsky

Earthward: Mixed Media

Velvet Morning, 2018, acrylic, molding paste, pumice on wood panel, 30 X 24 inches

 

“My focus includes the land and direct human impact on the land, memory, evoking time passed and looking back on an imaginary post-human world from the future.

Selected from several different bodies of work, these pieces all share the same focus on materials, texture, and experimentation. All are mixed media – collages and surface treatments that often include personal references to rural life on the small family farm where I grew up. The use of burlap, canvas and vintage fabric scraps, rough texture, and unfinished qualities are some of those references. These elements not only serve compositionally but reinforce the attention to the surface. Another recurring theme in many of these works is topographies of once inhabited earth presented in an abstracted way from above.

My work develops intuitively beginning with a color, shapes from fabrics, canvas scraps or a cursory idea. The emphasis on the physicality of the surface pushes these works into the same tactile space we inhabit.”

Joanne Lobotsky, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Farrell Brickhouse

Paintings

Reflection, 2019, oil on canvas, 40 x 30 Inches

 

“When I was around 8 years old I had a dream I was in a garden. I climbed this wall and realized that if I jumped over I would no longer have the protection and order of the garden and would be in the wilds. I jumped. It seems a life’s choice.

Making Art is a way to share the totality of what I’ve seen, touched and what has touched me.  I believe the making of a painting needs that moment of epiphany and a trace of how the imagery conveyed thru paint was discovered and experienced by the artist. Not a graphic notation of the language of experience but the mystery of it.

As a mature artist now 69 years old, I find I have this large vocabulary to draw from. Imagery that has woven its way thru my entire career is available and malleable. For me, Art is the providing of a genuine experience of what it is to be alive and in the world.  At its best making art is a revelatory experience, a conduit to the beauty and mystery in the miracle of simply being here.”

Farrell Brickhouse, 2019

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

Click – here- for slideshow images in the exhibition.

On Saturday, May 25th, a group of seven artists will open the season with a medley of exhibitions for the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. In celebration, the gallery will have solo shows (sculpture, painting, and photography). The works will be on display through June 16th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, May 25th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 

Main Galleries

Benjamin La Rocco

Love and Other Shadows

Falling Through, 2012-18, oil and acrylic on canvas, 49 x 24.5 inches

“These paintings are about my life over the past 7 years. Some of them took that long to make. I spent 11 years on one. There are paintings about cowboys and heroes. There are paintings about gods, goddesses, and sacrifices. There are paintings about dark places and terror. There are paintings about other worlds.  There’s a painting about a mushroom and one about a bluesman and another about a flower.  Many of these paintings carry a lot of paint on them, a physical record of the many hours spent working on them over their 7 years. A few were made in one or two sittings. They are all about loss, love and other shadows.”

             Ben La Rocco, 2019

 

Sculpture Garden
Jiang Weixian

Accidental  Sculpture

Growing #1, 12 x 12 x 63 inches,  2018, brass, Growing #2, 12 x 12 x 56 inches,  2018, brass, Growing #3, 12 x 12 x 50 inches,  2018, brass

“Some of my materials are natural, such as bamboo, sticks, branches, feathers, and leaves. Other materials I use have very natural origins, but they are more associated with manufacturing and industry. These materials include cement, iron, plaster, ceramic, gold leaf, bronze, copper, wire, rubber bands, and glazes.  Some materials work well together, whether their origins are more natural or not. Some materials do not work well together.

My work is an exploration into what kinds of materials work well together visually, on the one hand, but more important to me is that the materials complement each other physically. I let my pieces form and inform themselves as I work. I choose my materials for how they feel, physically, in my hands, and I let one stage of the object-making tell me what form or material will come next. The idea for an ultimate, final object only begins to form in my mind as it starts to form in my hands. This is the most primary form of manufacturing, as I see it, and that is how I think of my pieces. I take a bit from nature. I take a bit from industry. These materials come together in my hands, as a process of pure manufacturing”

Jiang Weixian, 2019

  

Ground Floor Carriage House

Joseph Haske

Nature Morte

 Nature Morte 4 (after Rousseau), 2018, acrylic on board, 20 x 20 inches

“I have often worked with a centrally positioned, iconic composition and before I have used appropriated images to reduce the presence of my own—too familiar—hand.

Henri Rousseau’s still lives in the Barnes collection moved me with their almost lurid power; ephemeral petals painted with an iron hand, blades of foliage like knives and ….. a vase of flowers tends to be in the center of the painting.  I repurposed the  silhouettes of his vases and flowers.

The French phrase “nature morte” for the English “still life” seems apt at this moment in the warming of our planet as fauna and flora disappear –  a poem to our passing?

These paintings careen between two extremes; oversaturated color and the almost total absence of color, from gaudy abundance to ashes –  our future?  The birds are from Audubon and again there is the poignant detail that most of his subjects he shot, the better to see. He took no joy in their death it was only a means to an end.”

Joe Haske, 2019

 

Carriage House. Second Floor
Denise Oehl

Ziaype Prints

Most Beautiful Wispy Drops, 2018 4.5 x 4.5 inches

“My relationship to my environment is voyeuristic.  I search for textures, compositions, and subjects that reflect the uniqueness of my surroundings.  Most of all, I look for those things that elicit a personal emotional response.

Using a medium format camera with a ground glass viewer, I am able to carefully compose, within a square, the image I hope to capture. In the darkroom, I am drawn to the Ziatype process, for its softness, and long range of tonality to complete my vision.”

Denise Oehl, 2019

 

Robert Oehl

Zone Plate & Pinhole, Photographs

Waxed Ziatype Prints

Forgotten Ritual, 2018 Zone Plate 4 x 5 inches

“My photographs are very personal.  I’ve tried to put aside vanity and intent, and let the photographs create their own subject and narrative.  My photographs are self- deprecating, vulnerable, raw, humorous, and histrionic; they are, for me, self-examinations of identity, as well as raw material for a personal mythology.

I am a process oriented photographer using a variety of rudimentary tools.  I use simple pinhole and zone plate cameras requiring long exposures.  Images produced with these cameras are characteristically dreamlike, dark, softly focused (grainy),  and seem better suited to a past era. In a predominantly digital world, my process is totally analog, employing film, paper, and chemical manipulation.”

Robert Oehl, 2019

 

Carriage House, Third Floor
Linnea Paskow

Paintings

Garden plan, oil on panel, 7 x 6 inches, 2018

 “I paint the images from my dreams. The characters appear as familiar or strange. I want to get to know them and live with them in my studio like visitors from another world. Some are furry and large others have one eye and others I can only see their hands. The feelings and light in the dream inspire colors and size of each piece. I’m interested in finding out what is underneath the conversations I hear and the places I visit.”

                Linnea Paskow, 2019

 

Carriage House, Fourth Floor
Pamela Blum

Dolls

Thin Doll, 2019, Encaustic, papier maché, plaster gauze, aluminum mesh, 11 x 5 x 2.5 inches

 

“These semi-figurative “Dolls” surprised me. They evolved from my previous sculptures but had to solve a technical need to hang from wires (They can also hang directly on a wall.).  As a result, I made bulbous “bodies” to hide hooks and “legs” to stabilize them.

With their aluminum mesh armatures plumped up with plaster bandages, papier maché, and layers of wax, these sculptures took on nearly human feminine personalities. Their abstracted forms and gestures remind me of adolescent preoccupations with body images and degrees of femininity that used to cause me everything from envy to revulsion.

The sculptures’ lush, dense titanium white surfaces have a very different presence from the cold, translucent zinc white I used in previous work. As a result, I left some of these sculptures a demure white that nearly hides their mars black “undergarments”. Other sculptures strut their stuff with black boots or stockings, and other abstract marks.

Most of these sculptures, with butt to viewer, appear to walk away. They are missing their arms, heads, and half their torsos. I continue to make work with a hefty measure of the abject combined by contrast with something funny and/or poignant in the gestures.”

Pamela Blum, 2019

 Peter Bonner

The Plains, New Paintings

On Saturday, April 27th, there will be an exhibition of paintings by Peter Bonner. The work will be on display through May 19th  with a reception for the artist on Saturday, April 27th  from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

          

The Fence in the Lady, 2019, oil on linen, 31 x 23 inches

 

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

Click – here- for slideshow images in the exhibition.

 

“Over the past few years, I’ve been thinking about “The Plains”, by Gerald Murnane, and the psychological landscape that exists as an inseparable conflation of mind, place and the tensions that time creates. These tensions evolve slowly, imperceptibly at times as they do in my paintings. In my paintings I watch as these tensions form, watching for the suggestive potentials of space, of narrative, of presence.

For me the process I employ to do this doesn’t beat about the bush, it’s intentionally rough, primitive even, and direct. It reveals and exposes those things I notice, like light, and half-formed memories of places or tiny details of interactions I never knew I’d witnessed. I think about the edges and how they dictate this psychological landscape where land and mind are one, and how this comes into existence in a space that’s flat and deep at the same time, a sort of elliptical space, like the lens in one’s eye.”

Peter Bonner

 

 2019

 Laetitia Hussain

Still Life Love Life

On Saturday, March 30th, there will be an exhibition of works by Laetitia Hussain. The work will be on display through April 21st  with a reception for the artist on Saturday, March 30th.

Laetitia Hussain

 Still Life Love Life, 2019, giclee print (1/10 edition), 7 x 7 inches

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

Click – here- for slideshow images in the exhibition.

 “Stones and trapezoids become symbols of chance encounters that shape an abstract idea into tangible works that lay between the natural and my spiritual world.  Transforming stones to bronze.  Choosing to repeat the shape of the trapezoid, to see it evolve and resonate into the complexity of sameness.  Seeing the possibilities that emerge while maintaining a few strict parameters. I have found that it is best to live my life the same way I make my work.  By heightening my awareness to see what presents itself and adopt it as a guide and learning its patterns and rituals that become a body of work.  Which creates space in time in the life I live. A measure of time, value and wealth.  Finding the value in something that comes out of pure chance and choice.  To pay attention to something,  giving it worth and life. A philosophy that can apply to animate and inanimate forms.”

Laetitia Hussain

 Ron Milewicz

Circumstances

On Saturday, March 2nd, there will be an exhibition of paintings by Ron Milewicz. The work will be on display through March 24th with a reception for the artist on Saturday, March 2nd from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Sun and Oak, 2019, oil on panel 24 x 18 inches

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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“The paintings in this exhibition are from two different places and times in my life. The earlier works are from the borough of Queens in New York City while the later ones are from the rural Hudson Valley town of Gallatin, New York. The paintings were made either from direct observation or from drawings that were made from direct observation. It is important that they are connected to a particular place and also important that they leave that place in some way. I am interested in the light and atmosphere of where I am working. I restructure each site as an image through means that are simultaneously intuitive and rigorous. Through the translation of a location into paint, I arrive at another location.”

Ron Milewicz

2019

 Rachel Rickert

Homebody

On Saturday, February 2nd, there will be an exhibition of paintings by Rachel Rickert in the Main Galleries. The work will be on display through February 24th with a reception for the artist on Saturday, February 2nd  from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Worship, 2018, oil and oil stick on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

Click – here- for Artsy images in the exhibition.

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“The home and other private spaces set the stage for repetitive actions. The closer I look at these routines, the more obscure they become. As a painter, I aim to capture instability within the activity of the figure and within the marks themselves—a state of between. Digesting my intimate world, I break down repeated behaviors; looking closer at domestic spaces; playing with both my attachment and detachment to what surrounds me.

I paint patterns to better understand them, yet with each study, they become less tangible. Undressing is the same every day, but when I obsess over the actions in this ritual, the image becomes unfamiliar as the body is contorted, shifting and shimmying. Suddenly what was so automatic becomes claustrophobic, what is ordinary is awkward, desperate, violent, and ridiculous. Figures appear trapped or enclosed by their own routine surroundings.

Currently, I am absorbing bourgeoning domestic patterns and discrete moments of my new life. Watching, and being watched. I am thinking about distance within intimacy, giving up of solitude, holding something so close it hurts.

The process of painting becomes part of the final image, as layers of decisions are revealed between firm and final moments. I am interested in an active looking experience for the viewer that mirrors the painting experience, where there is no place to rest. A constant search dominates the spectator and artist, finding solidity, then losing it again— playing between seeing the image and seeing the paint.”

Rachel Rickert

Main Galleries

On Saturday, January 5th, there will be an exhibition of paintings by Brian Rego in the Main Galleries. The work will be on display through January 27th with a reception for the artist on Saturday, January 5th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 Brian Rego

Tiny Mirrors

Oxford Square, 2018, oil on board, 11.25 x 16 inches

Click – here- for Artsy images in exhibition.

Click – here- for slide show images in the exhibition.

“A mirror is simultaneously looked at and looked through, yet its inherent quality is that it reflects the image of what is before it. This reflection is unbiased, save the character of the glass, the condition of light, and the state of the viewer. What is a painting if not a mirror? When I stand before a painting I am presented with a form, an image, and a set of ideas and experiences valued by the painter. I am also presented with my own reflexivity if the work is able to conjure something in me and I am able to receive the provocation of the painting. Tiny Mirrors is the name of the collection of work I have made over the past two years. The process of making these paintings has been one of consideration and confrontation; each reflecting something that is indirectly autobiographical and personal.”

 

Brian Rego

Click – here- 2018 exhibitions.