Past Exhibitions

On Saturday, July 22nd, there will be an exhibition of five artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through August 13th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, July 22nd from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 Front Galleries & Sculpture Garden
Bruce Gagnier

Animula

 

Pau, 2017, plaster, 64 x 19 x 21 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“Making a figure out of clay, sometimes I am on the inside and sometimes on the outside. The ideas that form are often far away, emerging from the past, as in Donatello and sometimes near at hand like the pieces of a person walking down the street. Trying to pack everything in leaves a residue and distorts the package.  The ingredients of the recipe for a figure are always the same but they come in various shapes and go together in different orders.”

            Bruce Gagnier, 2017

 Carriage House, Ground Floor
Pamela J. Wallace

in paper, in boxes

 

Army shirt as a long wide cloud, 2016, Abaca paper, dad’s army shirt, thread, wood, forged iron, 6 x 16 x 1.5 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“All the sculptures in the series “in paper, in boxes” contain, in large or small part, handmade Abaca paper. Abaca has been a primary material in my sculptural work since 2008, but because it is quite unpredictable, I continue to explore the many ways it can be manipulated and formed.  As a membrane, Abaca paper is thin and ephemeral, but also quite strong. As I stretch it over my box-like forms it becomes a container where I can place various unknown parts.  The more I experiment with its density, color, and form, the more its characteristics are revealed to me and suggest new possibilities.

 

In many of these pieces, a narrative begins to emerge. In some cases a landscape is revealed and others suggest figures, but all sit inside (or on top of) a box in such a way as to imply a scene. In abstract terms they are depictions of space and shape, yet they are also imbued with an emotional quality as well as a sense of time that remains both indefinite and unspecific.

 

My work originates from my interest in, and physical engagement with, objects and material as well as the way three-dimensional forms occupy space. As my work mostly sits on the wall and within close proximity to it, the three-dimensional interactions of one form against another, though small, are of the utmost importance to me.  In my studio, parts are laid out like specimens in a natural history museum or trays of parts on an assembly line. As each part is placed in the context of a sculpture, vague geometries begin to emerge. While I work, layers of paper, wood, cloth, and metal change as they are subjected to heat, water, light, and abrasion. Sewn elements and forged steel reference issues of work and gender. Working with a continuum of objects, I create systems and patterns that are often mapped out like constellations. My forms follow an invented non-linear geometry, where order comes and goes and the smallest detail is essential.”
 Peter Bonner

 Carriage House. Second Floor
Peter Bonner

Paintings

 

 

From the moment She had Conquered him, She was Free (The Golden Tornado),2016, oil on panel, 12 x 10 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“I think of these paintings as narrative paintings, but not literal in any sense. They are open and made up of elements that can come from any moment in time or place, but it’s important that those relationships; which bits are in which paintings and where, are revealed to me in the act of making the painting. I attempt to resist the temptation of second guessing what the meaning of that might be, and title the works accordingly.”

Peter Bonner, 2017

 Carriage House, Third Floor
Benjamin Pritchard

Paintings

 

 

Diptych (home), 2017, oil on linen, 28 x 18 Inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“My painting is mainly concerned with looking and time so I like to suggest looking at them over a period of time – the more the better.

 

I find I’m constantly mystified as to what a painting actually is so I go about trying to answer this question through the process of making which increasingly mirrors the process of living.

In this sense I think of painting as revealing more than describing a certain situation or subject. By the end even if I work with very specific intentions I’m still often surprised by the outcome of these things it’s as if they have their own idea of being independent of Will.

 

Recently I took a trip away in order to leave the work behind. I hung out with families and kids, had meals and went for walks outside. It was great but I could feel the paintings calling me back late at night. The paintings finished and unmade exerted a pull.

 

It’s very important to get your mind right when making work to see the temptations and negative thoughts and to properly recognize comparison thinking and hierarchical thinking when it arises. This type of thought is present of course. We live amidst this in the USA but the kind of work I am interested in is concerned with a kind of freedom that necessitates a separation from branding, style and any fixation with overt marketability.

 

My slogan would be “the work is the work is the work”

Benjamin Pritchard, 2017

 Carriage House, Fourth Floor
McWillie Chambers

Painting

 

 

Florida Beach – Umbrellas, 2016, oil on canvas, 22 x 30 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“The genesis of these paintings is a place filled with color and light, with the additional elements of freedom, sensuality, lust, empathy, and affection in the air.    This is an imaginary place, but based on glimpses of our own world.

 

Recently I read a news item about the death of a man in San Francisco named Gilbert Baker.   His name was unfamiliar to me but he was credited with the marvelous idea of the rainbow flag.   Gilbert Baker gave the LGBTQ community, and the wider world, this wonderful reminder of hope and promise.    According to the article he never profited from his idea and was quoted as saying, “The rainbow flag is a symbol of freedom and liberation that we made for ourselves.  We all own this flag.”

Coincidentally I had painted a few paintings with rainbows and rainbow imagery.    I decided to call this show “Find the Rainbow”, in honor of Gilbert Baker.  I hope this group of paintings that I have made will   remind my friends who see them of the light, color, and promise in the world.    When you see a rainbow in a painting, or in the sky allow yourself the luxury of taking some time to look at it, and think about what it stands for.”           

McWillie Chambers, 2017

 

 

On Saturday, June 24th, there will be an exhibition of six artists in the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. The work will be on display through July 16th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, June 24th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 Main Galleries

Farrell Brickhouse

New Work

HIG Lesson 17, 2017, oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches (How It Goes Series)

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“When I was around 8 years old I had a dream I was in a garden. I climbed this wall and realized that if I jumped over I would no longer have the protection and order of the garden and would be in the wilds. I jumped. It seems a life’s choice.
Making Art is a way to share the totality of what I’ve seen, touched and what has touched me. I believe the making of a painting needs that moment of epiphany and a trace of how the imagery conveyed thru paint was discovered and experienced by the artist. Not a graphic notation of the language of experience but the mystery of it.
As a mature artist now 67 years old, I find I have this large vocabulary to draw from. Imagery that has woven its way thru my entire career is available and malleable. For me Art is the providing of a genuine experience of what it is to be alive and in the world. At its best making art is a revelatory experience, a conduit to the beauty and mystery in the miracle of simply being here.”
Farrell Brickhouse, 2017

 Sculpture Garden

Howard Kalish

Sculpture

ORPHEUS (The Birth of Music), 2017, concrete, pigment & archival concrete paint, 92 x 28 x 16 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“In my opinion a sculpture is an embodiment in sculptural form of a constellation of characteristics, emotions, associations and influences meant to present something beyond “representation” (re-presentation) to the viewer. I think this is true whether the sculpture is figurative or abstract, good or bad. A good sculpture is a heightened clear embodiment, perhaps even an archetype, which conveys something meaningful to the viewer beyond that which may be articulated in words (if that were possible words would be a much more economical means than a sculpture). Each of my sculptures is trying to embody a different constellation of meaning centered around a particular deep aspect of our life.”
Howard Kalish, 2017

 Carriage House, Ground Floor

Jenny Snider


Seeing Reading and Writing

It Ain’t What You Say…, 1985, oil on paper, mounted on canvas, 14 x 18 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 Jenny Snider has been a lifelong student of art, literature, film, and history. She is showing new and recent works that reference the following sources, among others: the eponymously titledMemo from David O. Selznick; An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser; Middlemarch,by George Eliot; History: A Novel, by Elsa Morante; With Eisenstein in Hollywood, by Ivor Montagu; and Battleship Potemkin and Ivan the Terrible, two films by Sergei Eisenstein. Earlier paintings quote Tolstoy’s War and Peace and the Great American Songbook.

 Carriage House. Second Floor

Alison Fox

Paintings

1st Chakra – Mulhadara (root chakra – grounded force for the whole energetic system

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“The body of work I will be showing in June is called Chakra Paintings. The individual pieces are based on the ancient system of describing, isolating and identifying energy within the body as color, geometry, symbol, mantra, etc. known as the chakra system. These paintings take the color and geometry of each of the energy wheels as both the subject matter and formal constraint. I am interested in a prolonged relationship with the chakra system as an Artist and viewer of the Paintings I create.”
Alison Fox, 2017

 Carriage House, Third Floor

Rosie Lopeman

Paintings

Phantom Climb, 2016, oil on wood, 48 x 27inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“The work is about transformation. The kind of transformation I am talking about is not about advancing along a linear trajectory, but is a deepening of my love for what already exists. This informs my decision-making: honoring the materials, honoring the mistakes, honoring my impulses. I am pursuing an ideal, while continually submitting to what is there in front of me. When something is finished, it feels like a relic of the past and a harbinger of the future at the same time.”
Rosie Lopeman, 2017

 Carriage House, Fourth Floor

Kathy Osborn

Painting

Peering, 2016, oil on paper on board, 9 x 12 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“Re-arranging figures in a dollhouse gets turned into theatre. I’m standing outside the story.
It’s funny when body language – of a doll – becomes something get-able and paintable.

One figure hovering over another, one figure standing a little too far away from another figure. A hunched figure, a bowed head, a raised hand that blocks another figure. So little movement and so much gets said.

Completely familiar and completely strange.”

Kathy Osborn, 2017

 

On Saturday, May 27th, a group of artists will open the season with a medley of exhibitions for the Main Galleries, Sculpture Garden and Carriage House. In celebration, the gallery will have six solo shows (sculpture, photography and painting). The work will be on display through June 18th with a reception for the artists on Saturday, May 27th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

  Main Galleries
Isidro Blasco

Underground Passages

Underground Passages (Exit), 2017, C-Print, wood, Museum Board, 64 x 22 x 12 inches

 

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“I take the subway every day, and very often I find myself looking at a particular corner or stairs, or section of the tracks. Every time they look very similar but not the same as the day before. And I wonder if other people like me also look at these same sections of the subway system, and if by this looking that we all do, somehow we are effectively changing them.

I am guessing all this is just an effort to relate to these places. There is an emotional restraint that we all exercise, conveying not destruction but disorientation, the unsettlingly simultaneous expansion and compression of space that the urban dweller experiences in their way through the city and through its underground.”

            Isidro Blasco, 2017

 

Isidro Blasco was born in Madrid in 1962, and has lived in New York since 1996. He is a candidate for Ph.D. at the Architectural School of Madrid, and received his BFA from the Fine Arts School in Madrid. He was twice the recipient of the Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant in 1998 and 2010, and in 2000 he received the Guggenheim Foundation fellowship in Visual Arts. In 2004, Blasco had a solo exhibition of his works at the Reina Sofia in Madrid, and has since shown his work at the Museum of Modern Art/PS1, NY; and the Champion International Corporation (of the Whitney Museum of American Art), Stamford, Connecticut, among others. His works are included in collections at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, both NY; the Chicago Institute of Contemporary Art; and the Tweed Museum of Art, Duluth, MN. 

 

 Sculpture Garden
Weixian Jiang

Sculpture

Buddha, 2016, bronze, 32 x 32 x 55 inches

 

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“I take a bit from nature. I take a bit from industry. These materials come together in my hands, as a process of pure manufacturing. ”

Weixian Jiang, 2016

 

 Carriage House, Ground Floor
Thaddeus Radell

Hard Rain

Lear, 2016-17, oil/wax on panel, 48 x 38 inches

 

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“My work primarily consists of abstracted figure compositions- intuitive constructions that begin with random marks establishing larger masses of torsos, heads and limbs in an undefined setting.  Each form results from a long struggle between line and plane. As a result, the surface of the picture becomes dense and heavily textured, as clusters of graphic phrases and patches of color are repeatedly effaced and reapplied. Paint builds up into a compact, rugged terrain, resembling scorched bits and fragments from an archeological dig.

My motive is to find a visual equivalent to such broad themes as loss, pathos, redemption and grace that consistently haunt my waking hours. Only by intuiting these emotions figuratively into paint will I be able to transcribe what matters to me, the human condition. Frustrated with this rather blind approach to composing the figure in a void, in 2015 I began to coalesce the work around my reading of Dante, Shakespeare and Sophocles. More specific images began to emerge- The Crossing of the Acheron, the Death of Cordelia, Oedipus Afflicted. However, from the depiction of actual scenes, the paintings soon evolved into broader meditations on the relationship between the protagonists of these classic works; Dante and Virgil, Lear and the Fool, Oedipus and Antigone. To say that the images are specific in any way, is misleading. The texts serve to propel me more directly towards the same themes. The characters and their environment remain almost non-descript, reduced to a few lines, some muddied tones, perhaps one dense color and yet charged with meaning, or to quote Helion, ‘loud with meaning’.”

Thaddeus Radell, 2017

  

 Carriage House. Second Floor
Pauline Decarmo

Paintings

Chasing the Masters I, 2017, mixed media, acrylic & charcoal/wood panel, 40 x 36 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

 “My work is based on my surroundings, past and present.

I’m motivated by things that move me, thrill me and anger me.

I see a vast amount of space and I want to fill it with paint.”

Pauline Decarmo, 2017 

 

 Carriage House, Third Floor
Janice Nowinski

Paintings

 
Man at a Table, 2016, oil on canvas, 11 x 14 inches

 

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“As Manet said “There is only one true thing: instantly paint what you see. When you’ve got it, you’ve got it. When you haven’t, you begin again. All the rest is humbug.”

My paintings are made intentionally without a strategy or preconceived outcome in mind.

I do this in order to allow a place where sensations, intuition and spontaneity rule.

For several years, I’ve used photos as one of the sources for  my paintings. Many I took myself and others I found in books, catalogs and on the internet.  These images triggered the desire to respond in paint – from photos of masterworks to a friend’s snapshot of a holiday on the beach and everything in between.”

Janice Nowinski, 2017

  

 Carriage House, Fourth Floor
Robert Simon

Sculpture & Works on Paper

Slumped Head, 2010, ceramic, 13 x 10 x 11 inches

 

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

” A figure sculpture is a three-dimensional illusion of a three-dimensional reality.   In comparison with painting and other two-dimensional media, sculpture’s ability to occupy space in the same manner as the thing it represents affords it a more comprehensive equivalence to its subject.  However, this defining feature of the medium also constitutes its principal artistic liability, in that it potentially draws more attention to what a sculpted figure still lacks, which is movement and life.  In the absence of the ancient religious functions of statuary, what does it take to animate the modern sculpted figure, such that it might move the imagination of the viewer as if it possesses a spirit after all?   A living being is all motion and flux; even a professional artist’s model can’t hold perfectly still under the artist’s sustained scrutiny and appears different from moment to moment.  The model’s body can be rendered by means of molds, digital scans or photography, but such technologies freeze the subject at the moment of the recording.  A live being on the other hand is a moving target, and so are the fleeting images of pure imagination; therein lies the sculptor’s challenge and opportunity.

I sculpt in clay after a living person, from memory or from my imagination, employing a modeling technique that evolved in conjunction with drawing, and is equally grounded in the tactile engagement with the medium.  Modeling itself drives the content of the piece, without reliance on extrinsic signs, narrative or a specific image in mind.  When a narrative is present, as with Pedagogue, the theme emerges from the process of pushing around lumps of clay—surrealistically, in a sense.  The sculpted heads use touch to depict consciousness.  In this exhibition, all but one are fully imaginary even though they may appear to have features of an individual, and there is an element of allegory in their formal structure.  For example, the implied presence of an inner or outer conflict may encroach on observable appearance, pushing the common vocabulary of representation into uncharted territory, toward a shape that can’t be found on any known face.   The taboo against touching someone’s head is so essential it barely needs enforcement, but portrait sculpture violates the rule by proxy.  In sculpture, looking should reward the sense of touch, and obviate the need.  In the hands of the artist, touch sublimates to vision by producing an art object for the eyes to lie on, primarily.  Thanks to a companion taboo on touching the finished sculpture itself, the viewer inverts the sublimation by re-experiencing the artistic process in an act of projection that helps to bring the image to life in the imagination.  The taboo on touching the sculpted object is thus not simply about preserving or privileging it, but an essential factor in a mode of reception advanced by its removal from the viewer.”

Robert Simon, 2017

 

 Joseph Haske

Paintings

On Saturday, April 29th , a new exhibition will open at John Davis Gallery. The work of  Joseph Haske will be displayed with a reception for the artist on Saturday, April 29th from 6 to 8 pm. The exhibition continues through May 21st.

 

Asterion 3, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 20 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“The Minotaur is a monster created by the (misbehavior) adventures of others; his mother, her husband Minos, and the craft of the artist Daedalus.  Half man half beast he lives with no friend or country, confined in his loneliness and rage to the dark labyrinth.
Ennobled only in death at the hands of Theseus the hero.

Does sorrow exist only in the perfectly formed?

These paintings are <compilations> of passages of paint phenomena, layered, disparate, and possibly incoherent.  And like Asterion, often divided.

I wanted —in this search— to place myself outside my known area and find, perhaps stumble upon, another kind of order, another kind of beauty, another country.

…..but “let’s not be L 7”;
“Hattie told Mattie ‘bout a thing she saw,
Had two big horns and wooly jaw,
Wooly bully…. wooly bully”

Joseph Haske                

2017

Joseph Haske

Paintings

On Saturday, April 29th , a new exhibition will open at John Davis Gallery. The work of  Joseph Haske will be displayed with a reception for the artist on Saturday, April 29th from 6 to 8 pm. The exhibition continues through May 21st.sp;

Asterion 3, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 20 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

 

“The Minotaur is a monster created by the (misbehavior) adventures of others; his mother, her husband Minos, and the craft of the artist Daedalus.  Half man half beast he lives with no friend or country, confined in his loneliness and rage to the dark labyrinth.
Ennobled only in death at the hands of Theseus the hero.

Does sorrow exist only in the perfectly formed?

These paintings are <compilations> of passages of paint phenomena, layered, disparate, and possibly incoherent.  And like Asterion, often divided.

I wanted —in this search— to place myself outside my known area and find, perhaps stumble upon, another kind of order, another kind of beauty, another country.

…..but “let’s not be L 7”;
“Hattie told Mattie ‘bout a thing she saw,
Had two big horns and wooly jaw,
Wooly bully…. wooly bully”

Joseph Haske

Vilaykorn Sayaphet

Cross Country with Ari

On April 1st, 2017 there will be a solo exhibition of Vilaykorn Sayaphet.  The work will be on display through April 23rd with a reception for the artist on April 1st from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Bricks,2017, oil on bricks, 8 x 8 x 3 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“Rolling hills, cows, trees, flatlands, billboards, telephone wires, big-rigs, native forests, gazing out the window, daydreaming, comparing landscapes, anticipating future travels, wondering where we will live in the next five years, New York packed space, no sense of the land, of the magnitude of the land, the smallness of the people, we compare ourselves to the size of the hi-rises and not to the hills or ocean, as we escape from the city, we see our place in the world, the human is small, an insignificant creature, as we escape the stratosphere, we realize that we are even smaller, each of us a microscopic dot in the universe, unable to escape the city physically, we travel in our minds to places we’ve been before, memories of the mountains of childhood, of the landscape of young-adulthood, of recent trips to cities and places we have never been before, anticipation of places to visit in the coming years, of a home, a yard, a place to rest after a day at work, in New York we are packed on top of each other, those of us who lack extra resources carve out space in our basements, our kitchens, our friends’ studios, to paint, and why do we paint? to bring what is on the inside to the outside, to play with paint, combine objects, to create a tangible memorial to a memory, to give us rest from what is going on inside of our heads and hearts, the paintings take us to our memories, and takes the viewer along too, although the viewer projects his or her own memories onto the painting, the physicality of the paint reminds us that this is an object constructed by another person and not an attempt to copy the image of the memory, a painting is not a photograph, nor should it be, a painting is a force made physical, the use of materials to construct the immaterial.”

Vilaykorn Sayaphet

 Melinda Stickney-Gibson

THINKINGS

On March 4th, 2017 there will be a solo exhibition of Melinda Stickney-Gibson.  The work will be on display through March 26th with a reception for the artist on March 4th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

 “No Know,” 2015, oil on canvas, 40 x 32 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“In my opinion “thinking” is a very abstract concept.

Something out of nothing.

And almost impossible to clearly define as to what it is, because literally everyone has a nuanced, personal definition of their own.

That’s the beauty, frustration, and freedom of it.

This body of work has that premise as it’s start, and is ongoing.”

      Melinda Stickney-Gibson     

 

Jared Buckhiester

Cessation of Violence

Installation made in conversation with Catherine Lord

On February 4th, 2017 there will be a solo exhibition of works by Jared Buckhiester.  The exhibition will be on display through February 26th with a reception for the artist on February 4th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Maud’Dib I, 2016, ceramic, oil paint, 14 x 6 x 7 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

In his first solo show at John Davis Gallery, Jared Buckhiester asks Catherine Lord to help make sense of the conflagration that is his work. And Lord assists, not as curator, but as trusted viewer, friend, and counterpoint. Allowing formal qualities to direct decisions of editing and placement, Lord disregards narrative to broaden the gaps of possible connections.  This draws attention to the work’s strength and cohesiveness.

In a wooded clearing, a sweaty pro wrestler, truncated at his torso, projects a survival knife from his invisible blowgun.  Two aboriginal bodies tumble forward while striking a classical Greco Roman pose.  Their backs, one to the sky, one to the ground, flatly await the placement of a fountain basin. A cheer captain straddles a chalk line and Francisco Zapata lies dead in the arms of his bandit lover.

Buckhiester’s  ceramics and drawings are connected, not by material similarities or a narrative structure, but the sense  that they are born from the same soup, one that smells simultaneously psychosexual and political.  In this show Buckhiester argues that a separation of the sexual and political is hard to come by when dealing with any old subjective human brain. Lord help us all.

 

Katherine Mojzsis

Shapes Effect

On January 7th, 2017 there will be a solo exhibition of paintings by Katherine Mojzsis. The work will be on display through January 29th with a reception for the artist on the 7th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

“extend dimension,” 2016, oil on canvas, 46 x 40 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

“I take a path that does not follow the rules of perspective. I believe in the power of surfaces, that they have the ability to deepen and disturb – to “surprise” reality. Painting, drawing and collage allows me to build images, to deconstruct and dissect. Architectural forms, geometric shapes and invented landscapes are continuously adjusted until, in my hands, everything seems to be moving right. I explore free verse imagery in order to deceive the perception of rational space.”

Katherine Mojzsis

 

Click – here- 2016 exhibitions.