Current Exhibition

Jared Buckhiester

Cessation of Violence

Installation made in conversation with Catherine Lord

On February 4th, 2017 there will be a solo exhibition of works by Jared Buckhiester.  The exhibition will be on display through February 26th with a reception for the artist on February 4th from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Maud’Dib I, 2016, ceramic, oil paint, 14 x 6 x 7 inches

Click – here- for images in exhibition.

In his first solo show at John Davis Gallery, Jared Buckhiester asks Catherine Lord to help make sense of the conflagration that is his work. And Lord assists, not as curator, but as trusted viewer, friend, and counterpoint. Allowing formal qualities to direct decisions of editing and placement, Lord disregards narrative to broaden the gaps of possible connections.  This draws attention to the work’s strength and cohesiveness.

In a wooded clearing, a sweaty pro wrestler, truncated at his torso, projects a survival knife from his invisible blowgun.  Two aboriginal bodies tumble forward while striking a classical Greco Roman pose.  Their backs, one to the sky, one to the ground, flatly await the placement of a fountain basin. A cheer captain straddles a chalk line and Francisco Zapata lies dead in the arms of his bandit lover.

Buckhiester’s  ceramics and drawings are connected, not by material similarities or a narrative structure, but the sense  that they are born from the same soup, one that smells simultaneously psychosexual and political.  In this show Buckhiester argues that a separation of the sexual and political is hard to come by when dealing with any old subjective human brain. Lord help us all.

 

 

Vilaykorn Sayaphet

Cross Country with Ari

On April 1st, 2017 there will be a solo exhibition of Vilaykorn Sayaphet.  The work will be on display through April 23rd with a reception for the artist on April 1st from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.

Bricks,2017, oil on bricks, 8 x 8 x 3 inches

“Rolling hills, cows, trees, flatlands, billboards, telephone wires, big-rigs, native forests, gazing out the window, daydreaming, comparing landscapes, anticipating future travels, wondering where we will live in the next five years, New York packed space, no sense of the land, of the magnitude of the land, the smallness of the people, we compare ourselves to the size of the hi-rises and not to the hills or ocean, as we escape from the city, we see our place in the world, the human is small, an insignificant creature, as we escape the stratosphere, we realize that we are even smaller, each of us a microscopic dot in the universe, unable to escape the city physically, we travel in our minds to places we’ve been before, memories of the mountains of childhood, of the landscape of young-adulthood, of recent trips to cities and places we have never been before, anticipation of places to visit in the coming years, of a home, a yard, a place to rest after a day at work, in New York we are packed on top of each other, those of us who lack extra resources carve out space in our basements, our kitchens, our friends’ studios, to paint, and why do we paint? to bring what is on the inside to the outside, to play with paint, combine objects, to create a tangible memorial to a memory, to give us rest from what is going on inside of our heads and hearts, the paintings take us to our memories, and takes the viewer along too, although the viewer projects his or her own memories onto the painting, the physicality of the paint reminds us that this is an object constructed by another person and not an attempt to copy the image of the memory, a painting is not a photograph, nor should it be, a painting is a force made physical, the use of materials to construct the immaterial.”

Vilaykorn Sayaphet

 

Bruce Gagnier, April, 2015, bronze, AP, 67 x 20 x 19.75 inches
Bruce Gagnier, April, 2015, bronze, AP, 67 x 20 x 19.75 inches
Leonid Lerman, Poets Daughter, 2002, bronze, 33 x 24 x 22 inches
Leonid Lerman, Poets Daughter, 2002, bronze, 33 x 24 x 22 inches

 

 

 

 

Bruce Gagnier and Leonid Lerman

in the sculpture garden

throughout the winter and early spring.